Opportunities

Interested in joining the Plant Imaging and Carbon Transformation Research Group? We intake volunteers, undergraduate, and graduate students for work on funded research projects or independent study projects related to plant imaging and carbon transformation.

Our lab is very active with a across a range of different research topics. Our grad students often work closely with undergraduate volunteers and work study students as they work through different stages of their projects. Long-term volunteers and honor’s thesis students are often paired with a graduate student for support, and work on a side project that fits in to a larger, broad-scale work.

Strongly interested and experienced in remote sensing, biogeochemistry and/or microbiology? Check back for postings for graduate personnel (MSc and/or PhD) opportunities!

Current Opportunities

Start date: May 2020
Paid position: 2-5 days per week, minimum wage
Duration: Summer or longer upon request

Duties: to assist in collection of remote sensing imagery of above and belowground plant biomass. The student will collect imagery of vegetation in the field and the lab and utilize automatic extraction workflows to quantify metrics of various plant parts (e.g. leaves, stems, roots). This project link root traits to the magnitude and composition root-soil-microbial interactions. 

If interested, please contact: Dr. Cameron Proctor (cameron.proctor@uwindsor.ca)

Start date: May 2020
Paid position: 2-5 days per week, minimum wage
Duration: Summer

Duties: to assist in field data collection of agricultural crops and tandem Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) monitoring over the growing season. The student will collect biophysical and biochemical measurements of growing crops, and be involved in the processing of UAV imagery and extraction of key metrics. This project will assess the potential for UAV imagery in the long term agricultural plots at Woodslee and Harrow. 

If interested, please contact: Dr. Cameron Proctor (cameron.proctor@uwindsor.ca)

The student will investigate the efficacy of remote sensing to quantify the decomposition process in organic matter, specifically whether wetland vegetation stands can be used to monitor changes in the spectral evolution of plant litter. This study will utilize laboratory experiments involving various analytical techniques, and tools for temporal analysis of remote sensing imagery. Ideally, local field sites will be identified and a ground monitoring campaign initiated. 

If interested, please contact: Dr. Cameron Proctor (cameron.proctor@uwindsor.ca)

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